Steve Harvey Story: From Poverty To TV Millionaire

I’ve been a fan of his Family Feud MC career over the past decade. Obviously a talented, dedicated entertainer, now in his 60s, Steve began by working comedy clubs in Cleveland. He sometimes earned $25 a night, and lived in his car.

Now, in addition to hosting of the popular daily quiz show, Family Feud, he can be seen all over the TV screen in several other Steve-featured shows, as well as commercials, reruns and guest appearances. Fans admire him for his tireless work schedule, along with brilliant, ever-quick response sense of humor.

Maybe his most important contribution to TV is Steve’s effort to bring equal opportunity to African-American families. In all the previous decades of quiz shows, until just the past couple of years, they were virtually invisible. Today, they’re half of Steve’s daily contestants.

He also often features other ethnic groups, including Hispanic, Oriental and mixed-race families. And many contestants are upscale dressed in suits provided by Steve’s multi-million-dollar clothing business. It isn’t likely he’ll ever need to sleep in his car again.

How To Handle Robocalls & Other Phoney Intrusions

USA Today lists ten of the most irksome that ring in on your phone frequently. Of course, they all seem to happen at the worst moment. You’re in the shower, driving in heavy traffic and/or in a heavily romantic cuddle.

The best way to handle the unwanted, intrusive interruption is to hang up immediately. Skip the urge to yell some classic curse words, because in some cases, it permits the phony callers to record your voice. Then, with ever-advancing tech, they may be able to record your voice-activated ID and use it to hack your accounts at banks and other financial sources. http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2018/07/06/robocalls-top-10-scams-led-fake-comcast-capital-one-calls/759945002

Splitting Families Today Brings Back My Memories

All the sensational and political hype about heartbreaking troubles of illegal immigrant kids reminds me of my own similar childhood experiences. Our dad died when I was 4 and my brother 7. It happened way back during the Great Depression at the beginning of the 1930s.

Our widowed mom, who had come to America as an immigrant kid in the early 1900s, couldn’t get a job nor take care of her kids. So, she broke up the family by putting both sons in an orphanage. Our lives suddenly went from a family home to living in dorms with 40 other kids. As with children today who are taken from their families, both my brother and I at first were devastated. However, as we became acclimated, we actually succeeded in our daily group living and education experiences.

Because of our age difference, we lived in different dorms, and only got to see each other once a week for an hour after Sunday chapel services, called brothers’ line. The school, Girard College in Philadelphia, was considerably more than a poor orphanage scene from a sad Charles Dickens story.

In our ten years there, my brother and I were provided excellent living conditions and superior educations. After we left, we both earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees and went on to successful business careers. Mom, we know how much you suffered when you gave up your boys, but the years prove you made exactly the right decision.

Striking Sunset View From Our Apartment Window

So, that’s how the famous street got its name! My camera actually was pointed toward Hollywood’s famed Sunset Boulevard. Now that just about everyone has a smartphone-camera, there are unending opportunities to record such dramatic scenes. So, while out for a walk or traveling the world, postpone your grinning selfies once in awhile to shoot creative moments of Mother Nature’s wonders.

92-Year-Old Man Beaten While On Daily Walk

According to the LA Times, his offense was accidentally brushing into a gang member. Hit many times with a brick, he’s now in the hospital with a concussion, broken cheekbone and multiple bruises.

I’m the same age and hike along city streets twice a day. Not beaten yet, but I’ve been confronted by gangbangers, homeless, mentally ill and other potential sudden enemies. My advice to elderly and other walkers is to avoid trouble in your wanderings. Stay in well-traveled areas and avoid after-dark hikes on city streets.

If you’re in a neighborhood with a reputation for possible attack, be sure you have a charged smartphone handy and carry a small can of pepper spray. Also, if age is slowing you down, do your walks with at least one younger companion and/or large, well-trained protection dog on a leash.